Four Charged with Corruption

PRESS RELEASE BY CPIB
Four Charged with Corruption

 

          On 23 March 2021, four individuals will be charged in court for alleged corruption involving a total sum of about S$472,000. They are:

a) Christopher Tan Toh Nghee (“Tan”) (陈代义, 43-year-old male Singaporean), Associate Director of Singapore Management University (“SMU”) at the material time;

b) Kenneth Lum Hsien Loong (“Lum”) (蓝闲泷, 44-year-old male Singaporean), Director of International Alliance Marketing Pte Ltd (“IAM”) at the material time;

c) Cher Kheng Than (“Cher”) (徐敬廷, 43-year-old male Singaporean), Director of CJ Synergy Pte Ltd (“CJS”) at the material time;

d) Jeffery Long Chee Kin (“Long”) (龙子建, 43-year-old male Singaporean), Managing Director of Assetualize Pte Ltd (“AST”) at the material time.

2         Between August 2017 and November 2019, Tan allegedly accepted corrupt gratifications totalling about S$472,000 from Lum, Cher and Long over 50 occasions. These were allegedly meant as inducements to advance the business interests of their companies with SMU. For these actions, Tan faces 50 charges for offences punishable under Section 6(a) read with Section 7 of the Prevention of Corruption Act. Correspondingly, Lum, Cher and Long face 35 charges, seven charges and eight charges respectively for offences punishable under Section 6(b) read with Section 7 of the Prevention of Corruption Act for allegedly giving these corrupt gratifications to Tan.

3         Furthermore, in relation to this case, Tan and Cher each face one charge of giving false information to the Corrupt Practices Investigation Bureau (“CPIB”) under Section 28(a) of the Prevention of Corruption Act, as well as one charge for intentionally obstructing the course of justice under Section 204A of the Penal Code.

4         Singapore adopts a strict zero-tolerance approach towards corruption and other criminal activities. Any person who is convicted of a corruption offence can be fined up to S$100,000 or sentenced to imprisonment of up to five years or to both. The maximum imprisonment term for each offence of corruption can be increased to seven years if it is in relation to a matter or contract with the Government or public body, or a subcontract to execute work comprised in such a contract. Any person who is convicted of knowingly giving false information relating to corruption offences can be fined up to S$10,000 or sentenced to imprisonment of up to one year or to both. Any person who is convicted of an offence of intentionally obstructing the course of justice under Section 204A of the Penal Code can be fined or sentenced to imprisonment of up to seven years or to both.

5         Companies are strongly advised to put in place robust procedures in areas such as procurement and internal audit to prevent falling victim to corrupt acts by their employees. Guidance for companies on measures to prevent corruption can be found in PACT: A Practical Anti-Corruption Guide for Businesses in Singapore, which is available on CPIB’s website. Companies are also strongly encouraged to obtain certification under the Singapore Standard (SS) ISO 37001 – Anti-Bribery Management Systems, which is designed to help companies implement or enhance an anti-bribery management system to reduce corporate risk and costs related to bribery. 
 

Reference Links:

CORRUPT PRACTICES INVESTIGATION BUREAU

 

Last updated: 23 Mar 2021