Unlawful Business Transactions

PRESS RELEASE BY CPIB
Unlawful Business Transactions

 

             Employees should perform their duties honestly and act in the best interest of their companies. Those who conspire to gain business deals through corrupt means or cheat their companies will be firmly dealt with by the law. 

2          On 7 August 2019, six individuals were charged with the following: 

a)        Tay Chiu Song (郑汌松), 62-year-old male Singaporean

i.          Three counts of corruptly obtaining gratification amounting to S$105,600 between June 2015 and January 2016 [through Tan Hui Hong] from one Tan Hai Leng (“Tan”), Director of NNC International Pte Ltd (“NNC”) as a reward for awarding orders from Wartsila Singapore Pte Ltd (“Wartsila”) to NNC. These constitute an offence punishable under Section 6(a) of the Prevention of Corruption Act, Chapter 241. 

b)        Tan Hai Leng (陈海龙), 59-year old male Singaporean 

i.          Three counts of corruptly giving gratification amounting to S$105,600 between June 2015 and January 2016 [through Tan Hui Hong] to Tay Chiu Song (“Tay”), Sales General Manager of Wartsila as a reward for awarding orders from Wartsila to NNC. These constitute an offence punishable under Section 6(b) of the Prevention of Corruption Act, Chapter 241.

c)        Tan Hui Hong (陈惠凤), 60-year old female Singaporean 

i.          Three counts of abetment by intentionally aiding Tan, Director of NNC to corruptly give gratifications amounting to S$105,600 to Tay, Sales General Manager of Wartsila as a reward for awarding orders from Wartsila to NNC. These constitute an offence punishable under Section 6(b) read with Section 29(a) of the Prevention of Corruption Act, Chapter 241. 

d)        Mohammed Sharul Bin Shamon, 32-year-old male Singaporean

i.          Three counts of abetment by engaging in a conspiracy with Ismadi Bin Sinin (“Ismadi”), Director of Neigu Services Pte Ltd (“Neigu”) to cheat Wartsila on 444 occasions by dishonestly concealing the fact that Ismadi and himself had an interest in Neigu. As a result, Wartsila paid a total sum of about S$1,044,700 between December 2013 and September 2016, which it would not have done so if it had not been so deceived. These constitute an offence under Section 420 read with Section 109 of the Penal Code, Chapter 224, which is an amalgamated charge pursuant to Section 124(4) of the Criminal Procedure Code, Chapter 68.

ii.          Twenty-six counts of abetment by engaging in a conspiracy with Chan Yen Liu (“Chan”), a sales and service coordinator at Wartsila and Ismadi to cheat Wartsila on 26 occasions by dishonestly concealing the fact that Chan, Ismadi and himself had an interest in Neigu. As a result, Wartsila paid a sum amounting to about S$87,700 to Neigu between 2014 and 2016, which it would not have done so if it had not been so deceived. These constitute an offence punishable under Section 420 read with Section 109 of the Penal Code, Chapter 224. 

e)        Ismadi Bin Sinin, 34-year-old male Singaporean

i.          Three counts of abetment by engaging in a conspiracy with Sharul, a sales support engineer with Wartsila, to cheat Wartsila on 444 occasions by dishonestly concealing the fact that Sharul and himself had an interest in Neigu. As a result, Wartsila paid a total sum of about S$1,044,700 between December 2013 and September 2016, which it would not have done so if it had not been so deceived. These constitute an offence under Section 420 read with Section 109 of the Penal Code, Chapter 224, which is an amalgamated charge pursuant to Section 124(4) of the Criminal Procedure Code, Chapter 68.

ii.          Twenty-six counts of abetment by engaging in a conspiracy with Chan and Sharul to cheat Wartsila on 26 occasions by dishonestly concealing the fact that Chan, Sharul and himself had an interest in Neigu. As a result, Wartsila paid a sum amounting to about S$87,700 to Neigu between 2014 and 2016, which it would not have done so if it had not been so deceived. These constitute an offence punishable under Section 420 read with Section 109 of the Penal Code, Chapter 224. 

f)          Chan Yen Liu (陈燕柳), 39-year-old female Singaporean

i.          Twenty-six counts of abetment by engaging in a conspiracy with Ismadi and Sharul to cheat Wartsila on 26 occasions by dishonestly concealing the fact that Ismadi, Sharul and herself had an interest in Neigu. As a result, Wartsila paid a sum amounting to about S$87,700 to Neigu between 2014 and 2016, which it would not have done so if it had not been so deceived. These constitute an offence punishable under Section 420 read with Section 109 of the Penal Code, Chapter 224. 

3          Companies can become victims of corruption and financial crimes when rogue employees exploit loopholes in their work processes for personal gain. In this particular case, Wartsila suffered significant financial losses and also took a reputational hit as a result of these alleged offences by three of its employees.

4          Singapore adopts a zero-tolerance approach towards corruption and offenders will be taken to task by the law. Any person who is convicted of a corruption offence can be fined up to $100,000 or sentenced to imprisonment of up to 5 years or to both.

5         The CPIB looks into all corruption complaints and reports, including anonymous ones, and can be reached via the following channels:

a)      Visit or write to us at the CPIB Headquarters @ 2 Lengkok Bahru, S159047    or Corruption Reporting & Heritage Centre @ 247 Whitley Road S297830; 
b)      Call the Duty Officer at 1800-376-0000; 
c)      Lodge an e-Complaint at www.cpib.gov.sg/e-complaint; or
d)      Email us at report [at] cpib.gov.sg.

6          Where possible, the report should include the following information:

a)    Where, when and how the alleged corrupt act happened? 
b)    Who was involved and what were their roles? 
c)    What was the bribe given and the favour shown? 

 

Corrupt Practices Investigation Bureau

Last updated: 23 Aug 2019