Man Sentenced For Making False Allegation of Corruption

PRESS RELEASE BY CPIB
Man Sentenced For Making False Allegation of Corruption

        Corrupt offenders will face the full brunt of the law. Similarly, those found guilty of making false allegations of corruption will also be appropriately dealt with.

2      On 17 January 2020, Zhao Yankai (“Zhao”), 赵彦凯, a 29-year-old Chinese male, was sentenced to 3 weeks’ imprisonment, for an offence of knowingly giving false information under Section 28(b) of the Prevention of Corruption Act, Chapter 241. Two other offences of corruption and knowingly giving false information were taken into consideration in sentencing.

3       Investigations by the CPIB revealed that in April 2019, Zhao and 13 other sub-lessees were evicted from their rental unit at Ivory Heights Condominium (“IHC”) due to overcrowding issues. Following the eviction, Zhao left several unwanted pieces of furniture at the refuse disposal area of IHC, and failed to clear the furniture by the stipulated time. At Zhao’s request, Punitan a/l Balasunthar (“Punitan”), a security officer deployed at IHC (in the employ of William Secure Solutions Pte Ltd), gave Zhao a time extension to clear the said furniture. Zhao then corruptly gave Punitan $10 as a reward for not reporting him (Zhao) to the condominium management for failing to remove his furniture from the refuse disposal area by the stipulated time.

4       Following this incident, Zhao knowingly gave false information to a Sergeant with the Singapore Police Force, by falsely alleging that Punitan had corruptly asked for monies from him (Zhao), as an inducement for not reporting to the condominium management that there were illegal occupants moving into and residing in his (Zhao’s) unit. He also knowingly gave false information to a Principal Special Investigator with the Corrupt Practices Investigation Bureau, by falsely alleging that Punitan had corruptly asked for monies, loans and drinks from him, as an inducement for not reporting to the condominium management that there were illegal occupants residing in his rental unit (amongst other breaches).

5       Further investigations revealed that Zhao had concocted the allegations out of spite, as he thought that Punitan had sabotaged him and caused him to be evicted from another unit.

6       Singapore adopts a strict zero-tolerance approach towards corruption and other criminal activities. Any person who is convicted of a corruption offence can be fined up to $100,000 or sentenced to imprisonment of up to 5 years or to both. Any person who is convicted of an offence of knowingly giving false information under Section 28 of the Prevention of Corruption Act, Chapter 241, can be fined up to $10,000 or sentenced to imprisonment of up to 1 year or to both.

7       The CPIB looks into all corruption complaints and reports, including anonymous ones, and can be reached via the following channels:
         a) Visit or write to us at the CPIB Headquarters @ 2 Lengkok Bahru, S159047 or Corruption Reporting & Heritage Centre @ 247 Whitley Road S297830;
         b) Call the Duty Officer at 1800-376-0000;
         c) Lodge an e-Complaint at www.cpib.gov.sg/e-complaint; or
         d) Email us at report [at] cpib.gov.sg.

8       Where possible, the report should include the following information:
         a) Where, when and how the alleged corrupt act happened?
         b) Who was involved and what were their roles?
         c) What was the bribe given and the favour shown?


Corrupt Practices Investigation Bureau

Last updated: 17 Jan 2020