A Hidden Agenda Comes To Light

PRESS RELEASE BY CPIB
A Hidden Agenda Comes To Light

 

          Employees should not have official dealings with companies that they have a personal or vested interest in or use corrupt means to obtain confidential information for competitive advantage.

2        On 21 July 2017, three Singaporeans will be charged a total of 352 counts for the different offences under Penal Code, Prevention of Corruption Act and Official Secrets Act. They are as follows:

a) Rajkumar s/o Padmanthan, former Engineer (RSAF)

i) 99 counts of cheating the Government of Singapore (in particular, the Ministry of Defence) (the Government), whilst employed as a Republic of Singapore Air Force (RSAF) engineer, by dishonestly concealing the fact that he owned and controlled Goodwill Aviations System (GAS) when he recommended GAS as a contractor for RSAF aircraft system repair and maintenance works. As a result, the Government made payment for repair and maintenance works to GAS amounting to about S$869,000. These constituted an offence punishable under Section 420 of the Penal Code, Chapter 224.

ii) 27 counts of cheating the Government, whilst employed as an RSAF engineer, by dishonestly concealing the fact that Duratech Engineering Pte Ltd (Duratech) would subcontract RSAF aircraft system repair and maintenance works to GAS or Eagle Flight Aviation Services (EFAS) when he recommended Duratech as a contractor to RSAF. As a result, the Government made payment for repair and maintenance works to Duratech amounting to about S$259,000. These constituted an offence punishable under Section 420 of the Penal Code, Chapter 224.

iii) 67 counts of engaging in a conspiracy with Jeevan Arumugan to cheat the Government, whilst employed as an RSAF engineer, by dishonestly concealing the fact that he had an interest in the business of EFAS when he recommended EFAS as a contractor for RSAF aircraft system repair and maintenance works. As a result, the Government made payment for repair and maintenance works to EFAS amounting to about S$633,000. These constituted an offence punishable under Section 420 read with Section 109 of the Penal Code, Chapter 224.

iv) 24 counts of cheating the Government, whilst employed as a Technical Officer with One Marina Property Pte Ltd (One Marina), by dishonestly concealing the fact that he had an interest in the business of EFAS and Global Trade Well Pte Ltd (GTW) when he recommended EFAS and/or GTW as contractors for RSAF facilities repair and maintenance works. As a result, the Government made payment for repair and maintenance works to EFAS and/or GTW amounting to about S$57,000. These constituted an offence punishable under Section 420 of the Penal Code, Chapter 224.

v) One count of corruptly offering an unknown sum of money and future employment as gratification to one Sung Way Xiong, an RSAF engineer, to induce Sung to provide him with restricted pricing information (which Sung had access to by virtue of his employment as an RSAF engineer), an offence punishable under Section 6(b) of the Prevention of Corruption Act, Chapter 241.

vi) 33 counts of receiving from one Sung Way Xiong, an RSAF engineer, the moving price of Material Part Numbers, despite knowing that such information was communicated in contravention of the Official Secrets Act, Chapter 213, an offence under Section 5(2) punishable under Section 17(2) of the Official Secrets Act, Chapter 213.

b) Jeevan Arumugam, Sole Proprietor (Eagle Flight Aviation Services)

i) 67 counts of conspiring with Rajkumar s/o Padmanthan, an RSAF engineer, to cheat the Government, by dishonestly concealing the fact that Rajkumar had an interest in the business of EFAS when Rajkumar recommended EFAS as a contractor for RSAF aircraft system repair and maintenance works. As a result, the Government made payment for repair and maintenance works to EFAS amounting to about S$633,000. These constituted an offence punishable under Section 420 read with Section 109 of the Penal Code, Chapter 224.

c) Sung Way Xiong, Engineer (RSAF)

i) One count of corruptly agreeing to accept an unknown sum of money and future employment, as an RSAF engineer, from one Rajkumar s/o Padmanthan, as an inducement to provide Rajkumar with restricted pricing information (which Sung had access to by virtue of his employment as an RSAF engineer) an offence punishable under Section 6(a) of the Prevention of Corruption Act, Chapter 241.

ii) 33 counts of communicating confidential information relating to the moving price of Material Part Numbers (which he had access  as an  engineer with the RSAF), to Rajkumar s/o Padmanthan who was not authorized to have the said information, an offence under Section 5(1)(e)(i) punishable under Section 17(2) of the Official Secrets Act, Chapter 213.

3        Singapore adopts a zero tolerance approach towards corruption. The Corrupt Practices Investigation Bureau takes a serious view of any corrupt practices and will not hesitate to take action against any party involved in such acts.

Last updated: 28 Jul 2017